Test Retreat

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Archive for the tag “testing”

State Of Testing

congratulations

Guys of “PractiTest” and “TeaTime with Testers” with serious advisory board: Jay Philips, JeanAnn Harrison, Rajesh Mathur, Ben Linders, Justin Rohrman, and Jerry Weinberg – are doing that again – organising survey to get a picture of current state of testing. 

We all are curious how fellow testers are doing in other side of globe or next door. Here is link to results of survey from the last yearInteresting, right? But if you are attentive than will notice that 1000 participants is great, but to be able to do qualitative analysis, it is not enough. How to change it? Participate! And send a link to your colleague as well!

The organisers write that it will take 10 or less minutes to fill the survey . I timed my input – it took me 23:22 to fill it, including looking for currency calculator and tweeting about question 22. 

Why do I support this survey by writing blog post? Because I like data. Last year there were at least 1000 testers who take their profession serious. How many will be this year?

You may answer the survey now

Community Suffer

pardomas

Testing community has something like bastard kid syndrome. We are there, we are doing pretty good, but no one notices that.

Desperate longing for acknowledgement.

That is what makes us all together ill.

By now it should be clear that no one will come to legalise us. Our happiness is in our own hands.

If you do not like ISTQB, than come with better idea, but stop simply complaining! Stop unfruitful debates who dare to be in community and who not, cooperate and collaborate to build it better! Choose testing “school” which fits you the best and start to contribute actively!

People: the Wanz

I am starting new series of posts about people who inspires me.

Let me introduce you an unicorn: Michael “The Wanz” Wansley

 

Message to me: believe in yourself no matter what.

Comment Challenge

Week ago I observed twitter conversation about commenting on testing blogs. It started with Patrick’s tweet that he read 25 blog posts. Wow! Right? But than Danny asked him, how many comments Patrick wrote. Zero. TwitterI met Patrick few weeks ago, he is really nice guy! But this is not about Patrick, it is about habit. Ask me, how many comment did I leave last weeks? Zero! Why? Mostly I like what I read, it makes me think, it gives me new ideas, new approach for my issues. So why not to prize it, why not to tell it to the author? First excuses what come up in my mind – it takes time and effort. Better to read another blog post, than to think what exactly moved me. Some kind of fast-food reading. Do I want to be fast-food reader?

And than Geir had that idea of 1 comment per week. No matter that commenting idea in testing community is not new, any how it does not stick. Several before tried to kick it off. I get much inspirations from Rosie, but her community challenge last summer I missed out. This year SheyMouse talked about it in his TestBash 99 seconds talk. It is so easy – just one comment in every seven days. So this is it – I challenge myself to comment at least once per week!

Since it was already a week ago, I can report my first results :)

Good that I took that tiny habit workshop few month ago. Few things what I learned there are:

  • it should be light and
  • connected to some action.

Of course I link it with post reading. So now when I am reading, I weight it. If I would comment, what would I write? What exactly I like? What exactly I think I can use in my cases? Last week I commented on three blog posts. They were not the smartest comments, but I am learning and on my way to improve it. Join me! Together we are better.

 

What About Agile

I am big fan of Dilbert.

I like how in few pictures he captures the essence of software development, but in the same time I am ashamed, because I am part of it.

My trouble lately (several years to be specific) is agile. I have no trouble with methodology itself, but the way it is used. I struggled around till I saw this:

I did small research – talked to people and by the way asked about their info source on the subject. Some of business people really said that they have no idea what it is, but they learned that that’s the thing what sells. Agile is new sexy!

I start to think, how could I explain in small talk, how I understand agile and why it is worth to get to know more about it. Trade magazines often points out the speed as a key value, but never tells you how to get the speed. By pushing just accelerator you will not make very far on bend and bumpy road.

So let’s go back to the basics. First value on agile manifesto says:

Individuals and interactions over processes and tools

Fifth principle of agile manifesto:

Build projects around motivated individuals.
Give them the environment and support they need,
and trust them to get the job done.

Individuals, motivated individuals… and trust them! How about that?! The trust. Whom do you trust?

I did small survey (that’s the thing I always do if I am on something) and got shocking answers. My responders do not trust their colleagues and will not address the issue, no matter that they agreed that trust among the colleagues is very important.

As more as I think about the trust as much, I think that may be it is the source of my struggle. Current society are so focused on career and success that we forget about individuals and trust at a workspace. This project is just a step to next big thing.

As a tester I wonder quite a lot about things, what I thought is common sense, but turned out that it is just my sense and I have to explain it to others or write a bug report :) . I think that trust among colleagues is nothing agile-unique. And also satisfied customers and working software should not be something extraordinary – isn’t it something “by default”? Why we need manifesto for that? And if someone wrote manifesto for all that, why do we grade it by doing not properly?

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