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Archive for the tag “personal branding”

Embrace Weakness To Become Stronger

Since I am exploring personal branding I am very interested in all related topics, one of which is authenticity. I had a rough upbringing in software testing, many times I was told that I do not belong. Each time when it happened, some of my personal characteristics were named as an example. Because I wanted to belong I stopped to show what was mentioned by the critic. At the end there was no me in my public-me and I still was not enough… Finally it rung the bell. I have reached the bottom. Since then I am recovering from bad management and on my way to build authentic public-me.

Here is another one talking about authenticity. Meet Lina Zubyte! I was happy to get to know her in BTD2016 conference in Belgium, where I gave my first public test talk. She made an impression of young, smart, bright and unfearful woman. I looked at her and thought – it could be me in parallel universe – so unstressed and cheerful. After she started public speaking, it led her to her next career move, which did not turn out so well at the beginning, but as courageous as Lina is, she found strength in her weakness. You can learn about her journey in Linas talk “Finding Power in Authenticity”.

Last year when I met Lina at ATD, she said that I was one of people who inspired her to start public speaking. And again I thought – huh, parallel universes are only there to comfort us, but it is necessary to remind ourselves that they do not exist.

 

Addition from myself, while being weak and vulnerable: stay away from negative people.

Let’s Talk About Certifications

I am trainer*. I train people for ISTQB, IREB and other certifications. Company, where I work, offer practical sessions as well, but very few buy them. It is cool to have a paper, not a skills. Everyone who tries to prove me wrong, I ask, when did that person last time invested own money in own professional skills.

Partly this is the reason why I became a trainer: to change understanding of software quality for people, who are pushed to get certifications. I am trying to show, that training paid by company can be valuable and interesting. Another reason is, to inform new people about online resources. I know Rosie Sherry for some time, two years ago we did business together and I admire her vision and job she had done with building platform for testers. One day she shared that many testers say they wished they found out about Ministry of Testing earlier and we thought how to achieve it, because many testers I met never heard about testing community. Myself – I am still looking for requirements people group, no idea where they hide… Anyway, I chose my way – to be a trainer, to train for certification and to teach about software quality, about people behind scenes, to share book titles and addresses of blogs, online tools and platforms.

I like to challenge my trainees and ask why they choose this training. What expectations they have. What will happen/ change if they will get a certificate. I also like to talk about alternative certification, by building up their own brand and letting their whole work be a guaranty of good job. Do not wait until somebody will certify you, do it yourself! Take Mark Tomlinson as example. In his workshop Mark told us stories about his reputation as “something with performance guy”. If something happens which could be related to performance and no one in a company knows what to do else, he gets a call from business people and question “what to do?”, sometimes he has only an hour or so time and one chance to suggest an action. If it works, he gets the job, if not, he is out. James Bach sums it up : Reputation = opportunity = money.

So why people do not brand and certify themselves? If we try to name testers in automation, how many names will you know? Maximum 5-10? The same with any other aspect of testing. Why? Because branding is not testing and if you want to brand your testing you need to learn new skills. What is your message? How do you present your topic? Who is your target audience? Those are just few questions you should be able to answer.

I have different results with different target groups. When I left my previous company (400 people), CEO was surprised that everyone knows my name and my subject. I worked there for 2 years and my name meant QA and opposite. Today, 2 years later, when I meet somebody on a street or swimming pool (…) they greet me and start to talk immediately about testing tools or practices. It may sound simply, but it took a lot of energy and I talked literary with everyone, not only with developers and managers. Based on that I would say I know how to brand myself in local group. In testing community my name is unknown and I have not brand it really yet.

For those who come to training only to get certification, I say that I am very good in training people for certification, but I also say that certificate will not make them better testers. Certificate is a proof that they could answer 40 (45) questions in 60 (75) minutes and at least 65% (70%) of those answers where correct. Thats all. I also remind that one training does not cover ALL topics about software testing or requirements engineering.  ISTQB Foundation level syllabus had paragraph “code of ethics”, which talks about public interest and includes also following statement: “certified software testers shall participate in lifelong learning regarding the practice of their profession and shall promote an ethical approach to the practice of the profession”.

* one taxi driver looked at me very critically and said: you and trainer? It turned out that the address I named has gym in a basement, he knew it and he thought that I am saying that I am fitness trainer.

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