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Archive for the category “sources”

More Agile Testing > Planning

This is digitalised collection of testing resources created and published by Lisa Crispin and Janet Gregory in their book More Agile Testing: Learning Journeys for the Whole Team“. For more details on their work, visit http://agiletester.ca.

All already digitalised and checked parts in this series: Introduction, Learning For Better Testing, Planning, Testing Business ValueInvestigative TestingTest Automation, What Is Your Context?, Agile Testing in Practice.

Part III: Planning—So You Don’t Forget the Big Picture

Books

Links goes to amazon.com. No affiliate links.

Steve Freeman and Nat Pryce, Growing Object-Oriented Software, Guided by Tests, Addison-Wesley, 2009.
Robert Galen, Software Endgames: Eliminating Defects, Controlling Change, and the Countdown to On-Time Delivery, Dorset House, 2005.
Ellen Gottesdiener and Mary Gorman, Discover to Deliver: Agile Product Planning and Analysis, 2012.
Elisabeth Hendrickson, Explore It! Reduce Risk and Increase Confidence with Exploratory Testing, Pragmatic Programmer, 2013.
Michael Hüttermann, Agile ALM: Lightweight Tools and Agile Strategies, Manning Publications, 2011.
James A. Whittaker, Jason Arbon, and Jeff Carollo, How Google Tests Software, Addison- Wesley, 2012.

Articles, Blog Posts, Slide Decks

More Agile Testing > Learning For Better Testing

This is digitalised collection of testing resources created and published by Lisa Crispin and Janet Gregory in their book More Agile Testing: Learning Journeys for the Whole Team“. For more details on their work, visit http://agiletester.ca.

All already digitalised and checked parts in this series: Introduction, Learning For Better Testing, PlanningTesting Business ValueInvestigative TestingTest Automation, What Is Your Context?, Agile Testing in Practice.

Part II: Learning for Better Testing

Books

Links goes to amazon.com. No affiliate links.

Blog Posts and Online Articles

Courses, Conferences, Online Communities, Podcasts

More Agile Testing > Introduction

Two weeks ago on Slack, we talked about collections of good resources and Lisa wrote that she and Janet created a good one, but it is not available online. I volunteered to digitalise it and she agreed. Since then I am checking links and reading articles. What can I say – it is an AMAZING collection! Thank you, Lisa & Janet, for your kind allowance to publish the list online.

This is the bibliography list created and published by Lisa Crispin and Janet Gregory, More Agile Testing: Learning Journeys for the Whole TeamFor more details on their work, visit http://agiletester.ca.

All already digitalised and checked parts in this series: Introduction, Learning For Better Testing, Planning, Testing Business Value, Investigative Testing, Test Automation, What Is Your Context?, Agile Testing in Practice.

Part I: Introduction

Books

Links goes to amazon.com. No affiliate links.

Websites, Blogs, Articles, Slide Decks

 

Creating Magic

This week I am having an operation. I had a terrible fear, but turn out that my body is very good on healing and recovering. I have a lot of time and gladly I took some books with me. Finally, I am having time to read “Creating magic – 10 common sense leadership strategies from a life at Disney” by Lee Cockerell.

The book is very clearly written. Lee describes his way from a farm to a magic kingdom through failures and lessons learned. He is the author of Disney leader strategies, which he based on common sense. For me, as a tester, the reference to common sense made a special joy!

Lee starts the book with following words: “It’s not the magic that makes it work; it’s the way we work that makes it magic”. For ten years Lee was responsible for Walt Disney World with 59 000 employees. Rational, muscular, no-nonsense business strategy of Disney is utmost care and respect. For everyone! Guests AND employees. Treat your employees how you want your guests be treated.

The whole book is about leadership as an act of care and respect; as a responsibility not as a title or role. For Lee being a leader means making the right things happen by bringing out the best in others. How oft did you experience that at your work?

“The study found that business units with the highest scores in guest satisfaction where the same ones whose leaders received high ratings from their direct reports in qualities such as listening, coaching, recognizing people’s efforts, and giving people decision-making authority.” Ration 80:20 reflects the vital importance of inspiring, motivating, teaching, and other so-called soft skills. Lee opinion is that the soft stuff is actually the hard stuff, but if you get it right, everything else tends to fall into place. When everyone matters and everyone knows he or she matters, employees are happy to work, and they’re eager to give you their energy, creativity, and loyalty.

My favourite chapter is about strategy #7: Burn The Free Fuel. The main idea is about leaders emotional impact on employees. Lee summaries it in an acronym ARE: appreciation, recognition and encouragement. He calls it cost-free, fully sustainable fuel, which builds self-confidence, self-esteem, and keeps an organisation running clean and smoothly. “ARE is more powerful than the fuels that make engines roar and space shuttles soar, because it propels human energy and motivation.”

Another chapter which talks to me is strategy #6: Learn The Truth. It is about the hard way to build trust relationships with everyone with aim to know what you need to know to make a decision. “I had no idea that was going on” is not an excuse for a leader. ”Knowing what’s going on is your responsibility”. “I’ve seen it happen to a great many otherwise competent leaders. Some rely too much on vague data and dubious information; some isolate themselves, acting as though employees below a certain level had nothing to offer; some get defensive in the face of constructive criticism; and some develop reputations for lashing out at those who deliver unpleasant facts, so people stop coming to them.” One of his suggestions is to get out regularly. In one of his previous hotels he daily checked the whole hotel, each elevator and stairwell and corridor of all fourteen floors. On the way meeting and greeting guests and employees. Lee writes: “Getting out and about regularly was a great investment of time. Not only did it allow me to see the operations up close, but it helped me get to know everyone on the staff better, and all of them in turn became more comfortable telling me what I needed to know.” In software industry – how many CEOs do you know who walks through offices more then once a week?

 

I am reading this book in very special time in my life – taking care of my health, moving to the new house and switching careers. Some of my work experiences I made in toxic environments, I am happy that I had the strength to leave it in the past. I wish more people, not only with fancy titles, would read Lees book and that each of us can work and evolve in an environment, which empowers us and make us the best versions we can be.

Digital Information Units

I start new series of digital information units collection. Pieces I read and found interesting, moving or/and useful for my daily work.

  • Hackers Tactics, Techniques, and Procedures shows some very smart moves. My favourite staging cookies!
  • Blog about “not attacking people with a different understanding of terminology than you”. I like the list of misnomers as a reference that it is OK to be not correct and yes – people should not be attacked, but the same time I disagree with David.
  • Great article about developers bug diary. Do your developers write a bug diary?
  • did you test your back-ups? I remember a conversation with my sysadmin several years ago. update of our issue tracker went wrong and we found out that we do not have a backup. I partly saved the day because I never delete my emails. I offered my help to test the backup after it is set up, but the guy promised that he has it now. Week later system went down again and there were no backups again…
  • tips to organise information – simple but illustrative oracle
  • bringing value or standing in a way? We Latvians have the saying: the way to the hell is made of good intentions.
  • do you want to fail as a consultant? Here is a guideline how.

 

How To Create A Workshop

created by Ash Winter

created by Ash Winter

After a successful year of learning how to give a conference talk, I start a new chapter in my testing life and start to learn how to give a workshop. This is a bit trickier as with a talks, because of limited information about the topic.

As I asked the question in MOT Slack channel, I got respond from Ash Winter with the link to a mindmap he created for giving workshops. Take a look to it and spread the world. I think it is the awesome tool!  I am especially excited about it, because I took a workshop earlier this year, given by Ash, and I still use the skills I learned. So, I can say that I already tested Ash’s workshop creator skills.

A long time ago I worked as substituted teacher and had great fun with my students. Let’s see how I will do with a workshops. Will keep you posted.

Reading Club

I have a colleague, which is great tester and super good lunch buddy, but she is also mother of two little boys. She would love to learn more about testing, but struggles to find the time for it. On the other side – me, doing hundred things in the same time and quite oft finishing only some of them.

So we had an idea to read a book about software testing together. One week – one chapter, weekly discussions and thought sharing to keep our motivations high. We start with “Explore it!” by Elisabeth Hendrickson.

"Explore It!" A book on exploratory testing by Elisabeth Hendrickson

My colleague will read German translation, I – original English. We plan to start on Eastern. I will keep you posted how we will do.

Found On Internet

Excellent read about developers and some paradoxes Agile Methodology Breast Feeding

 

Without Pants Doing Twice

Books I currently read

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