More Agile Testing > Test Automation

This is digitalised collection of testing resources created and published by Lisa Crispin and Janet Gregory in their book More Agile Testing: Learning Journeys for the Whole Team“. For more details on their work, visit http://agiletester.ca.

Already digitalised and checked parts: Introduction, Learning For Better Testing, Planning, Testing Business Value, Investigative Testing. Comming soon:  What Is Your Context?, Agile Testing in Practice.

Part VI: Test Automation

Books

Articles, Blog Posts, Courses, Videos, Code Examples

MORE AGILE TESTING > INVESTIGATIVE TESTING

This is digitalised collection of testing resources created and published by Lisa Crispin and Janet Gregory in their book More Agile Testing: Learning Journeys for the Whole Team“. For more details on their work, visit http://agiletester.ca.

Already digitalised and checked parts: Introduction, Learning For Better Testing, Planning, Testing Business Value. Comming soon: Test Automation, What Is Your Context?, Agile Testing in Practice.

Part V: Investigative Testing

Books

Articles, Blog Posts, Slide Decks, and Websites

More Agile Testing > Testing Business Value

This is digitalised collection of testing resources created and published by Lisa Crispin and Janet Gregory in their book More Agile Testing: Learning Journeys for the Whole Team“. For more details on their work, visit http://agiletester.ca.

Already digitalised and checked parts: Introduction, Learning For Better Testing, Planning. Comming soon: Investigative Testing, Test Automation, What Is Your Context?, Agile Testing in Practice.

Part IV: Testing Business Value

Books

Articles, Blog Posts, Slide Decks, and Websites

More Agile Testing > Planning

This is digitalised collection of testing resources created and published by Lisa Crispin and Janet Gregory in their book More Agile Testing: Learning Journeys for the Whole Team“. For more details on their work, visit http://agiletester.ca.

Already digitalised and checked parts: Introduction, Learning For Better Testing. Comming soon: Testing Business Value, Investigative Testing, Test Automation, What Is Your Context?, Agile Testing in Practice.

Part III: Planning—So You Don’t Forget the Big Picture

Books

Freeman, Steve, and Nat Pryce, Growing Object-Oriented Software, Guided by Tests, Addison-Wesley, 2009.
Galen, Robert, Software Endgames: Eliminating Defects, Controlling Change, and the Countdown to On-Time Delivery, Dorset House, 2005.
Gottesdiener, Ellen, and Mary Gorman, Discover to Deliver: Agile Product Planning and Analysis, 2012.
Hendrickson, Elisabeth, Explore It! Reduce Risk and Increase Confidence with Exploratory Testing, Pragmatic Programmer, 2013.
Hüttermann, Michael, Agile ALM: Lightweight Tools and Agile Strategies, Manning Publications, 2011.
Whittaker, James A., Jason Arbon, and Jeff Carollo, How Google Tests Software, Addison- Wesley, 2012.

Articles, Blog Posts, Slide Decks

More Agile Testing > Learning For Better Testing

This is digitalised collection of testing resources created and published by Lisa Crispin and Janet Gregory in their book More Agile Testing: Learning Journeys for the Whole Team“. For more details on their work, visit http://agiletester.ca.

Already digitalised and checked parts: Introduction. Comming soon: Planning—So You Don’t Forget the Big Picture, Testing Business Value, Investigative Testing, Test Automation, What Is Your Context?, Agile Testing in Practice.

Part II: Learning for Better Testing

Books

Blog Posts and Online Articles

Courses, Conferences, Online Communities, Podcasts

More Agile Testing > Introduction

Two weeks ago on Slack, we talked about collections of good resources and Lisa wrote that she and Janet created a good one, but it is not available online. I volunteered to digitalise it and she agreed. Since then I am checking links and reading articles. What can I say – it is an AMAZING collection! Thank you, Lisa, for your kind allowance to publish the list online.

This is the bibliography list created and published by Lisa Crispin and Janet Gregory, More Agile Testing: Learning Journeys for the Whole TeamFor more details on their work, visit http://agiletester.ca.

Part I: Introduction

Books

Websites, Blogs, Articles, Slide Decks

 

Comment Challenge

Week ago I observed twitter conversation about commenting on testing blogs. It started with Patrick’s tweet that he read 25 blog posts. Wow! Right? But than Danny asked him, how many comments Patrick wrote. Zero. TwitterI met Patrick few weeks ago, he is really nice guy! But this is not about Patrick, it is about habit. Ask me, how many comment did I leave last weeks? Zero! Why? Mostly I like what I read, it makes me think, it gives me new ideas, new approach for my issues. So why not to prize it, why not to tell it to the author? First excuses what come up in my mind – it takes time and effort. Better to read another blog post, than to think what exactly moved me. Some kind of fast-food reading. Do I want to be fast-food reader?

And than Geir had that idea of 1 comment per week. No matter that commenting idea in testing community is not new, any how it does not stick. Several before tried to kick it off. I get much inspirations from Rosie, but her community challenge last summer I missed out. This year SheyMouse talked about it in his TestBash 99 seconds talk. It is so easy – just one comment in every seven days. So this is it – I challenge myself to comment at least once per week!

Since it was already a week ago, I can report my first results :)

Good that I took that tiny habit workshop few month ago. Few things what I learned there are:

  • it should be light and
  • connected to some action.

Of course I link it with post reading. So now when I am reading, I weight it. If I would comment, what would I write? What exactly I like? What exactly I think I can use in my cases? Last week I commented on three blog posts. They were not the smartest comments, but I am learning and on my way to improve it. Join me! Together we are better.

 

Mystery of achievements

Frequently I hear questions like this: you are married, have three kids, full time job, constantly reading and organising meet-ups, how do you do it?

I love Michael’s answer:

“If there is any “secret” in all of this, that statement is it. That’s the magic. It’s the magic of mindfulness, the secret is owning this process and being wholly responsible for success. When we do well, celebrate. When we backslide, acknowledge and learn. When we discover something doesn’t work any longer, adapt. Regardless of what it is, good or bad, euphoric or frustrating, enlightening or damning, “own it, log it, and move on”.

I’m not perfect by any means, but I know how this feels, and that is often a big help to others. Start your journey, and let me know if I can be of any help along the way.”

Read his story, it is very inspiring!

 

Comparing is source of many trouble. My way worked for me, you have to find your way. No mystery, just setting priorities and sticking to them in good and in bad times. If you want to learn something, than stop searching for excuses and use every chance to study. Even if it is only reading for five minutes a day. Make baby steps toward your goal.

Book suggestion for daily 5min reading:Lessons Learned in Software Testing